Elvis Presley Movies

 Elvis Presley Movies: List of all Elvis Movies 1956-1976
Andy Warhol Elvis “Flaming Star” Portrait for Auction at Sotheby’s
Andy Warhol sold for 81 million  to a  private dealer.  The Andy Warhol’s Triple Elvis at 7foot tall was taken from a publicity shot for the King’s 1960 movie Flaming Star, the painting – which features three identical images of musician in a gun-slinging pose

elvis-nixonThis  biopic about the King and the  historic White House meeting is stretched far beyond its flimsy premise. Inoffensive as it is inconsequential, this  foray into filmmaking from director Liza Johnson (Hateship Loveship) is a painful disappointment from start to finish, a frustratingly safe and unimaginative effort that squanders the potential of its story.  In Johnson’s defense, there wasn’t much ripe material to bungle here. The log-line is simple: billed as an “untold true story,” the movie chronicles the two days leading up to the monumental meeting between Elvis Presley (Michael Shannon) and President Richard Nixon (Kevin Spacey). Interest in this unlikely encounter stems from an iconic photograph taken Dec. 21st, 1970, which finds Nixon ( grinning) and Presley (in a daze) shaking hands.

Loving You – Dolores Hart and Elvis

Elvis Presley’s first four films, Love Me Tender, Loving You, Jailhouse Rock & King Creole influenced the metamorphosis of popular entertainment in the 50’s. This was a precious, fleeting time in Elvis’ life and career – long before the tabloid image of the aging rock star. Barely out of his teens, Elvis burst onto the movie screen with formidable poise and conviction. He came across as moody and charismatic – a mix of sexual dynamite and enormous charm. Elvis was the rebel who instantly picked up where James Dean left off. But the image of untamed youth that Elvis projected in his first four movies would soon be history. By the time he returned from the Army in 1960 to make GI Blues & Blue Hawaii , he was no longer the rebellious, anti-hero of just a few years before. His hair was shorter, his sideburns were gone – even his music was subdued. Elvis had definitely changed – and it showed.



LOVE ME TENDER (Elvis’ First Movie) ( November 1956) a story set during the Civil War and Elvis plays Clint, the youngest of the Reno Brothers. On the first day of shooting, Elvis arrived with the entire script memorized – his lines plus those of the other actors. He told reporters: “I wouldn’’t care too much about singing in the movies.” Love Me Tender was not an Elvis vehicle. He did not get top billing and he does not appear until 20 minutes into the film. He has no screen kiss but he does sing 4 songs. The movie was a major box-office smash, clearly due to Elvis’ appearance. It earned back its million-dollar production cost in less than a week. Faster than any previous Hollywood film, despite critics’ skepticism about Elvis’ acting ability. Watching Love Me Tender Elvis’ mother walked out during her son’s death scene and said that she never, ever wants to be witness to that image again. Memorable Scenes: Elvis’ first screen appearance is ploughing a field. His character introduced as young and innocent, and Elvis promotes a sincere image.

5     G.I. Blues (1960)
6     Flaming Star (1960) 
7     Wild in the Country (1961)
8     Blue Hawaii (1961)
9     Follow That Dream (1962)
10   Kid Galahad (1962)
11   Girls! Girls! Girls! (1962)
12   It Happened At the World’s Fair (1963) 
13   Fun in Acapulco (1963)
14   Kissin’ Cousins (1964)
15   Viva Las Vegas (1964)
16   Roustabout (1964)
17   Girl Happy (1965)
18   Tickle Me (1965)
19   Harum Scarum (1965)
20   Frankie & Johnny (1966)
21   Paradise Hawaiian Style (1966)
22   Spinout (1966)
23   Easy Come, Easy Go (1967)
24   Double Trouble (1967)
25   Clambake (1967)
26   Stay Away, Joe (1968)
27   Speedway (1968)
28   Live A Little, Love A Little (1968)
29   Charro! (1969)
30   The Trouble With Girls (1969)
31   Change of Habit (1969)

LOVING YOUWoody and ElvisWoodyToyStory (July 1957) The success story contained in Loving You closely resembles the rise to fame that Elvis was experiencing at the time. His character, Deke is introduced as a delivery boy who discovers a natural talent for performing and soon reaches national attention as a singer. In contrast to Love Me Tender Elvis appears in nearly all the scenes of Loving You, and it’s the only color Elvis movie from the 50’s. Elvis story is presented on-screen in Loving You as a wholesome tale of success helping to transmit the idea that he was not such a threat to middle America after all. The soundtrack is packed with songs, establishing a formula where Elvis’ music promoted his films and vice versa. There are many outstanding musical performances in the film, along with a number of impressive acting moments.

JAILHOUSE ROCK (November 1957) This is considered by many critics to be Elvis’ most classic film. Coming at the height of his 50’s popularity, he portrays a cynical ex-convict turned pop-singer. Elvis received $250K plus 50% from the profits of the film that grossed just under $4 million, ranking #4 for the year. Elvis’ dialogue features the latest slang & his wardrobe was cutting-edge rock-n-roll fashion. His manner and dress did much to reinforce his rebel image. Elvis had told the press when he first came to Hollywood, “I took this screen test where I was real happy, I didn’t like that. Then I did other one where I was mad at this guy and I liked it better. It was me.” Jailhouse Rock must have been the role Elvis was waiting for.

KING CREOLE (July 1958) was Elvis’ personal favorite. Based on the Harold Robbins’ novel A Stone For Danny Fisher, King Creole is a dark suspense-filled tale of troubled teenager who grows up quickly after a brush with society’s worst element. The role was reportedly once offered to James Dean. Shot on location in New Orleans, King Creole boasts an all-star cast including, Walter Matthau, Dean Jagger & Carolyn Jones. Michael Curtiz of Casablanca fame was the director. King Creole earned Elvis favorable reviews as an actor, but drew the lowest gross for his 4 films in the 50’s. The script is filled with complex scenes that allowed Elvis to explore a full range of his acting abilities. King Creole hinted at a movie career that was never to be for young Elvis Presley. Many believed that this impressive acting performance, he had opened the door to play additional dramatic roles. Unfortunately, this was never to be the case.

Elvis Documentaries
Elvis: That’s The Way It Is (1970)

Elvis Last Concert Elvis Last Song on Stage 26 June 1976

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